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In Recognition Of Old Do Di

An Experimental Voice Recognition Poem of the Song Old Do Di Day

by Roy D. Follendore III

Copyright © 2005 by RDFollendoreIII

June 18, 2005

 

Old Adobe home to that date,

that your money on the bond

sale bag(s) somebody

that of the day.

 

O. deny they avoided a date that

your money of Bob Dylan

Ache son, by the bat

of the day.

 

The “do that day”

on Tuesday they

better money out of a bill

that somebody battled the day.

 

And then

 

O. do that they,

avoided a date

that your money of Bob Dylan ate.

Somebody that, all the way.

do that they

avoided a date

that your money on a Bob Dylan ate

somebody that of the day.

 

Note: Make of this what you will because you should. In a way it is free thought poetry, limited only by the readers lack of associations. You should realize that this did not start out to be a poem. After speaking the words to Camptown Races three times as a test for a voice recognition system, I noticed poetic nature of the new ideas which were encoded through shear error. As a poet, after rereading the output in that context I saw patterns from the original poem, mixed with strange new ideas, I had seen this in working with watercolors. As an image artist, I have always been interested in that thin difference that exists when something changes and becomes non recognizable. Because of that, I decided that this was a worthy enough poetic thought experiment to allow it to be a poem. It is an interesting poem because begs to ask more questions through the strange statements that it seems to make. Where does poetic creative vision come from? Is it from some sense of perfection, or is perfection something that poets do after the creative fact? Does the sense that we make from poems exist before the poem? Most of us would want to believe that this is true. Maybe what the poetic mind is actually creating already exists.  For all we know, all poems are actually one poem, translated differently, so that minds can make new sense from them; though even that is a poetic thought. Knowing this now you really should take a moment and slowly reread the poem to enjoy it for what it is.

 

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Copyright (c) 2001-2007 RDFollendoreIII All Rights Reserved